Twisted Truth

It seems to never fail that when the media gets a hold of a story of rape that facts and details are muddled. No, they aren’t outright lies but an image is painted in the viewer’s imagination to believe a picture very different from the facts.  The picture that is painted is often one where the viewer feels a sense of security as long they don’t behave a certain way or are careful.

I’ll never forget reading an article in the paper one day about a rape that happened in the local community. The media made it sound like the victim was walking alone in the middle night in the alleys of the town. After a little digging I discovered that the truth was very different. Was the victim walking alone at night? Yes, but at 7pm in the summer when the sun is still out. Was the victim walking around by herself? Yes, but  in the main streets of the town. It wasn’t till after the perpetrator came after did she ran off the main street. Hmmm…sounds very different then the first story. I believe that the purpose of twisting of the story is a kind of denial. People don’t want to believe that they can get raped and be doing “all the right things” (which are what by the way?). The truth is the most safety conscious person can become a victim of rape.

One of the main reasons for that is because the idea that most rapes are committed by strangers is a myth!!! Most rapes are committed by someone the victim knows well and usually trusts. Think about it who is the easier victim; the one who is cautious and safety conscious, or a close friend where trust and a sense of security is already built.  There are even many cases of perpetrators grooming a victim, because their ultimate goal is to gain trust and then assault. Another fact; it is more likely for a victim of stranger rape to report then compared to acquaintance rape. There are definitely barriers to reporting for both categories, but many victims of acquaintance rape don’t know what to think or feel about the situation. The shock of a violent act from a person of trust may delay reporting.

So what does this mean? Do we walk around terrified and  grow inability to trust? No. Unfortunately any one of us can become a victim. If it happens to you KNOW it is not your fault and don’t rely on society to tell you if qualified as rape or not. Trust your instincts.  If you know someone or hear of a rape; start by believing them. Don’t question the circumstances surrounding it; that isn’t your role. Victims often blame themselves for things that are completely out of their control. Our role is to support them and reaffirm that it is not their fault.

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Triggers and Seasons

Apple pie, a fire burning, a snowy breeze, and raindrops pitter patter….things we associate with the Fall and Winter season.
The change in seasons usually brings with it certain smells or imagery we may associate with a variety of memories. The sense of smell has a strong connection to memories. The smell of apple pie may invoke wonderful memories of a grandmother’s cooking at a Holiday gathering, but sometimes the sense of smell can be a source of betrayal for those who have been victimized.

Unfortunately the brain is very sensory based when it comes to trauma. ” All it took for the air to smell just right, or a foggy cold morning, or a smell and the memories come flooding in. I let myself reflect on some of it for a while, to process it, and I began to remember details”

The words of this survivor reflects on what so many may experience. Many times one may not even know what a trigger is until it happens and even then it may be difficult to pinpoint the source. The trigger may start a flood of emotions and panic; this is where good mindfulness and grounding techniques come in handy. The DoD Safehelpline App has a great resource for Guided Imagery. If that doesn’t work try this link to find an app that suits your needs ( http://www.healthline.com/health-slideshow/top-meditation-iphone-android-apps#2 ) . With triggers being unknown or sudden it is important to have resources available when it happens and you can plug in and become grounded again.

Aside from triggers the Holidays itself can be a source of stress or anxiety for anyone and these exercises will help one be able to better cope with daily challenges.

The other advice I leave is the importance of developing boundaries. As a survivor copes with the assault the demands of life may become increasing loud. It will take time and work, but it okay to say no and to take care of yourself. Getting involved in counseling may assist you in making the small sustainable steps to create boundaries with those involved in your life.

If the Holidays begin to become too much I want to offer an additional support service. The Veterans Crisis Line. It is for active or inactive duty military and their family. They assist with many different issues or concerns.
They can be reached online at: http://www.veteranscrisisline.net or reached at 1-800-273-8255

Mindfulness- Bringing Peace to Recovery

Mindfulness

The idea of mindfulness is often foreign to the military and today’s culture in general. The world screams at us to do more and tells us not stop until we drop, but that is the furthest thing from healthy. Mindfulness doesn’t mean to take it easy, but it is the practice of quieting one’s mind in order to function more effectively. Mindfulness is a good practice for all peoples, but it has particular benefits to those who have experienced some sort of trauma.

A sexual assault survivor may experience many different forms of PTSD; from flashbacks, panic attacks and hyper vigilance. Aside from the symptoms of trauma; a survivor may experience “cloudiness” in their thinking. Their whole world was turned upside down and suddenly the ability to function in the daily work routine is impaired. This is where mindfulness exercises come in handy. It’s not about coming to some magical place where everything is fine, but rather finding acceptance in the current moment.

Right now I want you to take a moment to think about your now. Are you safe? Are you comfortable? What does your now look like? In these moments it will be easy for your mind to wander to what is wrong, but I challenge you to refocus your thoughts. The past may scream hurt, pain, and an atrocity committed against you and the future may lead you to fear, but what is your present like? In this current moment I’m safe, I have a decent job and I know that I have people in my life who truly love and care for me. In my own life I have to focus on the now, because the past may hurt and the future might be scary, but I know I can find peace in the present moment.

This is a new approach for NAS Lemoore’s SAPR Team and we would love to know what you would like to read! For more information use the contact form below!